Trump's election confirms disenchantment with party political stitch-up

Trump's election confirms disenchantment with party political stitch-up

by Martyn Greene
article from Monday 28, November, 2016

DONALD TRUMP’S stunning victory is the final proof that it is game over for the political elite.   First Corbyn winning against the odds, then Brexit beating even the bookies’ predictions – and now Trump; all point to a system that is under siege. In the UK and the US people have been looking to break the establishment but the media have just not been listening.

Take Greece, deceived into the Euro by its political class and false assurances by multinational banks – then forced into austerity-Max as the price of staying inside the Euro. A referendum is held, and – in the full knowledge of the consequences of breaking with the EU elite the people still vote to reject the EU/IMF deal and German-led hegemony – but the Greek political establishment still cuts a deal that keeps the austerity rolling on.

It is parties that keep this show on the road because political leaders feel that they cannot work without them. But Trump has broken the mold. Never before a Republican and having endorsed Democrats in the past Trump has used the Republican machine against itself and then against the Democrats. First he beat the Republican establishment itself and then he beat the Democrats at their own game of political posturing and demonization. Of course there is outrage – "they don’t like it up ‘em" like they have previously dished it out. (Let us recall that it was Hilary Clinton’s campaign for the Democratic nomination for President in the 2008 election that challenged the birthing credentials of Barack Obama.)

Rather than the US election being the beginning of the end for democracy, it is the end of the beginning. 

After universal suffrage was delivered in Britain, as recently as 1928, we made a big mistake by continuing with the abrogation of power to our political parties.  Politicians cynically set us at war with each other to further their own careers. They bid for our votes by asking us to support taxes paid by other people – the farther away from our lifestyles the better – to pay for “free” goods and services costing millions if not billions to fund.

The truth is that in the Western world our political elite has marginalised and impoverished its constituents.  It can be in the UK, the US, France, Germany or anywhere else where political parties control the process of government.

At the same time and as a result, failing public services in education, housing, health care and policing have created a downtrodden class whose hopes and dreams have been crushed. Little wonder then that people have become tired of political tribalism and are now fighting back by breaking rank and voting against the predicted norms.

There is an alternative. The Free Parliament campaign has set out a new political framework for the UK. All of the component parts are already in place and have been for a very long time. All we need will be to overhaul the system so that it works for us – rather than against us.

The aim is to break the grip of political parties by helping more independent candidates – like the late Margo MacDonald, Michael Bell, and hopefully now Zac Goldsmith – to be elected on putting their constituents ahead of any political party.

Our campaign was launched in May this year by Lord Digby Jones who commented;

“We need a response which is more inclusive because what party political doctrine has done is deliver exclusivity to the establishment. Eventually we will pay a price with disengagement and following disengagement, when you have people who don’t care, it is very easy for bad things to happen.”

Truer words have rarely been said.

The election of Donald Trump as president of the USA is without doubt a game-changer and will help to speed reform on its way. For that reason alone, we should welcome his election.

Martin Greene writes on behalf http://freeparliament.org.uk and can be reached at martyn.greene@freeparliament.org.uk 

 

ThinkScotland exists thanks to readers' support - please donate in any currency and often


Follow us on Facebook and Twitter & like and share this article